ART ON MY BLOG WAS GETTING OUT OF HAND

martina-naldi:

🍃🌿🌱
Sep 13, 2014 / 172 notes

martina-naldi:

🍃🌿🌱

(via fuckyeahmoleskines)

Sep 12, 2014 / 62 notes

mleeblog:

Finished! This drawing will be in a group show at the Known Gallery in Los Angeles. There’s some really amazing artists including my friends from RVMP. Show opens September 25th, so check it out if your in town!

September 12, 2014

(via fatmalovestodraw)

Aug 17, 2014 / 123 notes

pprotozoans:

Catharsis/dreams

prcrstln:

"the sound of two Catholic high-school girls in mid-knife-fight"
Aug 17, 2014 / 38 notes

prcrstln:

"the sound of two Catholic high-school girls in mid-knife-fight"

Aug 14, 2014 / 24,444 notes

killapede:

some more outside drawings! I went to LA for a while

(via menstrualcramps)

museumgifs:

Kehinde Wiley(American, born 1977)Houdon Paul-Louis, 2011Bronze with polished stone baseThough Kehinde Wiley is best known for his portraits of African American men in contemporary clothes, posed in stances drawn from paintings of the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries, here he shifts from painting to sculpture. In both the lift and the return of the young man’s head and the open V of his zippered collar, this bronze references an eighteenth-century marble bust by Jean-Antoine Houdon (see illustration). In substituting male for female, black for white, and present for past, Wiley upends the earlier sculpture even as he quotes it. His interpretation encourages us to acknowledge the limitations and assumptions of representation and provokes a reconsideration of both stereotype and portraiture.
Aug 8, 2014 / 101 notes

museumgifs:

Kehinde Wiley
(American, born 1977)

Houdon Paul-Louis, 2011

Bronze with polished stone base

Though Kehinde Wiley is best known for his portraits of African American men in contemporary clothes, posed in stances drawn from paintings of the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries, here he shifts from painting to sculpture. In both the lift and the return of the young man’s head and the open V of his zippered collar, this bronze references an eighteenth-century marble bust by Jean-Antoine Houdon (see illustration). In substituting male for female, black for white, and present for past, Wiley upends the earlier sculpture even as he quotes it. His interpretation encourages us to acknowledge the limitations and assumptions of representation and provokes a reconsideration of both stereotype and portraiture.

Aug 6, 2014 / 218 notes
Aug 4, 2014
Jul 26, 2014 / 2,561 notes

ikeiks:

The art of Elfandiary

(via fuckyeahmoleskines)

Jul 22, 2014 / 1 note

coollookingleaf:

"goodbye rabbit, hop hop"

the sweetest animation on earth